Design, Graphic

Less Is More: Elegant and Minimalist Editorial Designs.

Less Is More: Elegant and Minimalist Editorial Designs.

Get inspired with a fresh D4U collection devoted to elegant and sophisticated minimalism in design for books and editorials.

Less Is More: Elegant and Minimalist Editorial Designs.

New inspirational design set is ready and this time it’s all about design for print. Continuing the topic of minimalism in design, which we have already presented for interfaces, today let’s look through a bunch of examples how minimalism is applied in modern editorial design concepts.

Just to briefly remind, minimalism is a word of broad meaning used in various spheres of human activity. Merriam-Webster dictionary defines it as “a style or technique (as in music, literature, or design) that is characterized by extreme spareness and simplicity”. Being applied to more and more fields, it saves its core traits: meaningful and simple. Minimalism as a direction of visual design got especially popular in the 1960s in New York when new and older artists moved toward geometric abstraction in painting and sculpture. The movement found its impression in the artworks associated with Bauhaus, De Stijl, Constructivism and so on. In diverse spheres of visual arts, a key principle of minimalism was leaving only essential part of features to focus the recipient’s attention as well as support general elegance. Lines, shapes, dots, colors, spare space, composition – everything should serve its function being thoughtfully organized. Today we can meet minimalism in a variety of life spheres: architecture, arts, photography, all kinds of design, literature, music and even food presentation. “A shape, a volume, a color, a surface is something itself. It shouldn’t be concealed as part of a fairly different whole. The shapes and materials shouldn’t be altered by their context”, said Donald Judd, an American artist associated with minimalism. Working in this style, designers seek to make the interfaces simple but not empty, stylish but not overloaded. They tend to use negative space, bold color and font combinations, and multifunctional details making the simplicity elegant. The line dividing simple and primitive is very thin. That is why not all the designers take the risk of trying this direction: some may think it looks too decent, the others don’t find enough ways to show much with fewer elements.

So, welcome to get inspired with a fresh D4U collection devoted to elegant and sophisticated minimalism in design for books and editorials.

book-editorial-design

editorial-design-layout
book-editorial-graphic-design
By Oscar Riera Ojeda Publishers

design-editorial
graphic-design-book
By Oscar Riera Ojeda Publishers

editorial-design-poetry-book
editorial-design-book-layout

By Katharina Schwarz

minimalist-editorial-design
editorial-minimalism
editorial-design

By Katharina Schwarz

editorial-design-examples
editorial-design-graphics
editorial-graphic-design-examples

By Lucas Blat

book-design
book-graphic-design
book-graphics
book-design-space

By Serafim Mendes

editorials-design
minimalist-editorials

By Julia Kuba

editorial-design-example
editorials-design-examples

minimalism-editorial-design
By Lucas Blat

book-graphic-design-example
book-design-minimalism
book-design-editorial
book-designer-inspiration
book-editorial-design-inspiration

By Tim Bisschop

book-design-examples
book-editorial-design-examples
recipe-book-design
recipe-book-example-design
design-example-books

By Tim Bisschop

minimalist-editorial-book-design
Less Is More Elegant and Minimalist Editorial Designs.
architecture-book-editorial-design
architecture-book-design

By Fons Hickmann m23

book-design-inspiration
books-design-examples
books-design

By Naranjo — Etxeberria

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